The holy martyrs of Lazeti

Lazeti is a region in southern Kolkheti (Colchis), the ancient kingdom located in what is now southwestern Georgia and northeastern Turkey. In ancient times, Lazeti was a center of Georgian culture. The holy Apostle Andrew began the conversion of the Georgian nation from this very region.

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A Byzantine Christmas Carol

Byzantium

H. Glykatzi Arveler / Ελένη Γλύκατζη – Αρβελέρ

Introduction

The term Byzantium is rashly given to the Christianized eastern part of the Roman Empire, which had Constantinople as its administrative and cultural center and which controlled significant regions of Europe, Asia and Northern Africa from 330 to 1453. At its acme, it extended from the Euphrates to Spain and from the Nile to the Danube. The various peoples that inhabited these lands had a common characteristic: they were influenced, more or less, by Greek civilization, which was mainly conveyed through language.

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Holy Mount Athos will never perish

Source: Romfea

Byzantium may have perished and did not survive as a state. Nevertheless, it survives spiritually as a genuine way of life and as a culture. I would dare say that Byzantium lives on spiritually within the Holy Mount Athos! Our Lady’s garden exhibits resilience beyond time, as well as a unique way of life and a reviving vigor. read more… Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

St Constantine and Helen (May 21) – «In this thou shalt win»

Great Constantine this renowned sovereign of the Christians was the son of Constantius Chlorus (the ruler of the westernmost parts of the Roman empire), and of the blessed Helen. He was born in 272, in (according to some authorities) Naissus of Dardania, a city on the Hellespont. In 306, when his father died, he was proclaimed successor to his throne, in York. In 312, on learning that Maxentius and Maximinus had joined forces against him, he marched into Italy, where, while at the head of his troops, he saw in the sky after midday, beneath the sun, a radiant pillar in the form of a cross with the words: «In this thou shalt win» (Greek: ΕΝ ΤΟΥΤΩ ΝΙΚΑ). Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

Dismissal Hymn (Apolytikion) and Kontakion of the Worship of the Precious and Life-Giving Cross (3rd Sunday of the Fast) – Απολυτίκιο και Κοντάκιο της Κυριακής της Σταυροπροσκυνήσεως

VatopaidiFriend: Notice what the Kontakion (the second hymn) says. It is LITERAL, not «metaphorical».

Dismissal Hymn. First Mode.

Save, O Lord, Thy people, and bless Thine inheritance; grant Thou unto the faithful victory over adversaries. And by the power of Thy Cross do Thou preserve Thy commonwealth.

(Note: The original says «sovereigns» instead of «faithful» and «barbarians» instead of «adversaries». The «sovereigns» are the pious emperors of Byzantium, the best state in all of history, which – with the exception of some dark periods – provides a luminous example of true Christian spirituality, and unsurpassed economy, welfare, culture, ecology etc. The «barbarians» are the ungodly, backward hordes who always wanted to ravage the Byzantine Empire, and, after more than 1000 years, finally did – temporarily.)

Απολυτίκιον. Ήχος α΄.

Σώσον, Κύριε, τον λαόν σου και ευλόγησον την κληρονομίαν σου, νίκας τοις βασιλεύσι κατά βαρβάρων δωρούμενος και το σον φυλάττων, διά του Σταυρού σου, πολίτευμα.

Kontakion. Grave Mode. READ MORE… Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

National Healthcare and the Church-State Relationship in Romiosini (Byzantium)

hospital

http://www.amazon.com/Birth-Hospital-Byzantine-Empire/dp/0801856574

«Dr. Miller is a learned and enterprising historian with a fascinating theme. He shows beyond a doubt that the Western hospital tradition goes back to the early Byzantine Empire in the fourth century.» — Medical History

Fr. Romanides writes about the relationship between Church and State in the Roman Empire following the conversion to Christianity of Emperor Constantine the Great saying:

«The great struggle between paganism and Christianity in the time of Emperor Constantine the Great (306-337) is reflected in the difference between Roman Greeks (meaning Pagans) and Roman Christians. All Pagan Romans were defending their aristocratic ancient Hellenic identity and traditions which was being torn apart by the aristocratic identity of the cure of glorification which was open to all Romans, both gentis and non-gentis, and to all non-Romans.» Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

St. Irene Chrysovalantou

irene icon athens

St. Irene Chrysovalantou flourished after the death of the greedy Emperor Theophilos the first. After Theophilos’s death his spouse, the most reverend and God-loving Theodora, took the throne. The Empress Theodora supported the Orthodox faith and re-established the veneration of the holy icons, as was the tradition of the Orthodox Church. The Empress Theodora was reigning in place of her son, Michael, who was not yet of age to assume rule of the empire.

When Michael was twelve years old Theodora sought to find him a suitable wife. She sent her scouts on a mission to find a beautiful girl who was noble as well as virtuous and worthy of becoming an empress. Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

Byzantines beat the Vikings to America by 500 YEARS!

"Main Altar" with Greek Doric style plinth. To the left is fish-shaped cupule (holes) pattern. Both hold candles for ceremonies. Photos courtesy of the author

"Main Altar" with Greek Doric style plinth. To the left is fish-shaped cupule (holes) pattern. Both hold candles for ceremonies. Photos courtesy of the author

Connecticut’s 5th Century Church

by John Gallager

In the stillness of Cockaponset State Forest, southern Connecticut, near the town of Guilford, masterfully carved from solid rock, stands North America’s oldest Christian church. Recent epigraphic evidence found here suggests that it is 1500 years old, and linked to a voyage of Christian Byzantine monks who fled from North Africa during the 5th Century, in the wake of the Vandal invasions. Greek and North African inscriptions, Greek cupule patterns in the form of Chrismons (monograms of Christ), baptismal fonts, a cathedra or throne, candelabras and an altar have been found at the site.

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Blocked from Europe by the impregnable walls of Constantinople

Byzantine naval battle

Byzantine naval battle

«Blocked from Europe by the impregnable walls of Constantinople and the unyielding spirit of the Emperor and his people, the armies of the «Prophet» were obliged to travel the entire length of the Mediterranean to the Straits of Gibraltar before they could invade the continent- thus extending their lines of communication and supply almost to breaking point and rendering impossible any permanent conquests beyond the Pyrenees. Had they captured Constantinople in the seventh century rather than the fifteenth, all Europe- and America- might be Muslim today».

Byzantium, the Early Centuries. John Julius Norwich

The Early Centuries of the Greek Roman East (3)

The coronation of David. Miniature from the byzantine Psalter of the National Library of Paris (early 10th century). Η στέψη του Δαβίδ. Μικρογραφία από το βυζαντινό Ψαλτήρι της Εθνικής Βιβλιοθήκης των Παρισίων (αρχές 10ου αιώνος).

The coronation of David. Miniature from the byzantine Psalter of the National Library of Paris (early 10th century). Ο Δαβίδ στεφόμενος. Μικρογραφία από το βυζαντινό Ψαλτήρι της Εθνικής Βιβλιοθήκης των Παρισίων (αρχές 10ου αιώνος).

(continuation from 2)

Literature and the Arts

Outside the Augustaeum, in Constantinople, one would notice a statue of Justinian wearing what was known at the time as the armour of Achilles. But the Emperor carried no weapon. Instead he held in his left hand the symbol of power of the Christian Roman Emperor, the globe, which signified his dominion over land and sea, and on the globe was a cross, the emblem of the source of his rule. Justinian as Achilles was a natural example of the fusion of classical culture with Christianity in the Eastern Roman Empire. This fusion begun before Justinian’s time but was to continue to be one of the distinguishing marks of education and literature in the age of Justinian. Along with the legal and architectural splendours discussed above, the reign of Justinian also saw a flowering of literature such as the Greco-Roman world had not enjoyed for many years.

The earliest Christians avoided the worldly learning of the Greeks with their «philosophy and deceit», and saw no way in which the blasphemous literature could be brought into any sort of relationship with Christian teaching. This reaction of many Christians, as late as the second century, could be summed up in Tertullian’s famous phrase, «what has Athens to do with Jerusalem?» In time, however, Christian thinkers began to realize that there was much to be carried over into Christian teaching from the Classical Greeks. Socrates and Plato, for example, often seemed to approximate Christian thought. Likewise many of the writings of Aristotle could be fit right into the teachings of the Church.  MORE… Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

The Early Centuries of the Greek Roman East (1)

Justinian with his entourage (courtiers and guards), the bishop of Ravenna Maximian and clergy. Mosaic in the church of St. Vitalius in Ravenna (548AD). Ο Ιουστινιανός με την συνοδία του (αυλικούς και φρουρούς), τον επίσκοπο της Ραβέννας Μαξιμιανό και κληρικούς. Ψηφιδωτό στην εκκλησία του Αγίου Βιταλίου στην Ραβέννα (548 μΧ).

Justinian with his entourage (courtiers and guards), the bishop of Ravenna Maximian and clergy. Mosaic in the church of St. Vitalius in Ravenna (548AD). Ο Ιουστινιανός με την συνοδία του (αυλικούς και φρουρούς), τον επίσκοπο της Ραβέννας Μαξιμιανό και κληρικούς. Ψηφιδωτό στην εκκλησία του Αγίου Βιταλίου στην Ραβέννα (548 μΧ).

I.The Foundation of Constantinople and the Adoption of Christianity

We begin our story about the history of Romiosini or the Greek Middle ages with the founding of Constantinople, the capital city of the Eastern Roman Empire. Constantinople was founded by the Roman emperor Constantine I (324-337) who wanted to establish, for various political reasons, a new capital city for the Roman Empire in the east. Ultimately, this change was brought about because of the turmoil which the Roman Empire was facing in the west at the time. With much of the western territories having been destroyed by the invasions of the Germanic tribes, Rome was in constant danger of being attacked. Moreover, with the eastern frontier of the Empire stretching over all of Asia Minor and Syria, Rome was no longer in a position to check the ongoing hostilities with Persia. Consequently, after a series of internal struggles among the ruling powers of the Empire, Constantine -who emerged victorious-chose as the location of his new capital the ancient Greek city of Byzantion. In 324 Constantine transformed Byzantion into «The New Rome» or «Constantinopolis», the City of Constantine. The people often referred to it simply as «The City» or, in Greek, «Hi Polis». MORE… Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »

Ομιλία Μπακογιάννη για την έκθεση του Αγίου Όρους

568-514

Ομιλία Υπουργού Εξωτερικών κας Ντόρας Μπακογιάννη στη συνέντευξη Τύπου
για την έκθεση «Ο Άθως και η Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία – Θησαυροί του Αγίου Όρους».Κυρίες και κύριοι,

Με χαρά σας καλωσορίζουμε όλους στο Υπουργείο Εξωτερικών.

Η διοργάνωση της έκθεσης «Ο Άθως και η Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία – Θησαυροί του Αγίου Όρους» Le Mont Athos et l’ Empire Byzantine – Trοsors de la Sainte Montagne αποτελεί ένα ιδιαίτερα σημαντικό διεθνές πολιτιστικό γεγονός.

Ένα πολιτιστικό γεγονός που φιλοδοξεί να προβάλει την παράδοση της Αθωνικής Πολιτείας στην Γαλλία και σε ολόκληρη την Ευρώπη. Τα εγκαίνια της έκθεσης θα τιμήσουν με τη παρουσία τους ο Πρωθυπουργός κ. Κώστας Καραμανλής και ο Οικουμενικός Πατριάρχης, κ.κ. Βαρθολομαίος. Διαβάστε τη συνέχεια του άρθρου »